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The Trucking Industry of 2012

Electronic OnBoard Recorders



2/19/2012 by Tanya Bons

OUR NEW HOURS OF SERVICE (HOS)

Industry Effect: Increase in Hiring, Increase in Shipping Costs, Increase in Pricing on Consumer Goods

Currently the trucking industry is in an uproar over the change in the Hours of Service. The American Trucking Association, ATA, is suing the Federal Motor Carrier's Safety Association, FMCSA, in regards to the new rules.

Previously truck drivers could work a maximum of 82 hours in a seven-day period. The new HOS, taking effect July 2012, limits a driver's week to 70 hours. Also, drivers must take at least a 30-minute break after working eight hours. The new HOS also require a 34-hour rest period each week with two consecutive nights off from 1:00am to 5:00am. The new hours are being established to fight fatigue and increase safety on our roads.

The new HOS will cause companies to re-work routes, change deliveries, hire additional drivers, create new delivery fees and run drivers during peak traffic hours. It is estimated to cost the industry about a billion dollars to implement the new hours.

The new HOS will cause drivers to change their sleeping patterns, change their delivery patterns and ultimately, lose money along the way.

The FMCSA isn't solving any problems; they're creating new ones. If the FMCSA wants to tackle the issues of fatigue and safety they have to start with the basics. Commercial drivers drive when they're tired, lie about their hours, eat while they are driving and speed for one reason; they get paid by the mile. How many miles a week would you drive if you were getting paid .34 cents a mile? - Yep, as many as you could.

If the FMCSA really wants to take distracted, tired, unsafe drivers off the road they need to mandate the way these drivers are compensated.

In the end, the new HOS rules will force some drivers into early retirement and other drivers into career changes for financial stability. Carriers will find themselves replacing the drivers that left and hiring additional drivers just to manage the deliveries they currently have. Shippers will have see negative results in their supply chains, distribution and productivity and their costs will be added to the price of their wares.

ELECTRIC ON BOARD RECORDERS (EOBR)

Industry Effect: Increase in Hiring, Increase in CSA Compliance, Increase in Pricing on Consumer Goods

In 2010 the FMCSA, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Association, issued a rule that would require motor carriers with a 10% violation rate on their Hours of Service, HOS, regulations to have a mandatory Electric On Board Recorder, EOBR, installed on their equipment before June 4th of this year.

Currently there is a proposed rule that would make it mandatory for all drivers documenting their HOS with logbooks to have an EOBR. The proposed rule would affect about 500,000 carriers.

In May of 2006 Europe made it mandatory for all new commercial trucks to have a Digital Tachograph, EOBR. The majority of European drivers with EOBRs are paid hourly rather than per the mile; carriers paying per the mile are looked on as being deceptive.

EOBRs can track drivers' locations, speed and hours making it difficult and costly for carriers to push drivers into racking up the miles. Some carriers will push their drivers to make the delivery on time but the EOBRs will make that pushing difficult and it will be reflected in shippers' pricing. The FMCSA proposal will require carriers to monitor and regulate their current drivers more closely and hire additional drivers to cover their "renegade" drivers.

Drive safe,
Tanya Bons


More Related Articles and Information



UPDATE: June 2012, Electric On Board Recorders has become mandatory however the enforcement of having the recorders has not been approved so even though it is required, it will not be enforced.

Trucking Industry 2012: Introduction

Trucking Industry 2012: Training Our Truck Drivers

Trucking Industry 2012: Compliance, Safety, Accountability and CSA

Trucking Industry 2012: The Carriers Hiring

Trucking Industry 2012: The Trucks We Drive

Trucking Industry 2012: Roads and Borders

Trucking Industry 2012: Industry Results

By: Spirit CDL.com By: Spirit CDL.com